All posts by garrisonleykamphd

“Stand Out” Author Dorie Clark

Dorie ClarkToo many people believe that if they keep their heads down and work hard they’ll be recognized on the merits of their work. But that’s simply not true anymore. “Safe” jobs disappear daily. To make a name for yourself, to create true job security, and to make a difference in the world you have to share your unique perspective and inspire others to take action. And, Dorie Clark is THE person to show you how.

Dorie Clark is a marketing strategy consultant, professional speaker, and frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, TIME, Entrepreneur, and the World Economic Forum blog. Recognized as a “branding expert” by the Associated Press, Fortune, and Inc. magazine, she is the author of Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future which has been translated into Russian, Chinese, Arabic, French, Polish, and Thai and her most recent book, Stand Out: How to Find Your Breakthrough Idea and Build a Following Around It. Clark consults and speaks for a diverse range of clients, including Google, the World Bank, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, the Ford Foundation, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Yale University, the Mount Sinai Medical Center, and the National Park Service. She was also named one of Inc. magazine’s “100 Great Leadership Speakers for Your Next Conference,” and recognized in Forbes as one of “25 Professional Networking Experts to Watch in 2015.”

Listen to Garrison’s interview with Dorie Clarke:

Find out why Stand Out was named the #1 Leadership Book of 2015 by Inc. magazine

Check out Dorie’s website and follow her on Twitter

Life is about Improvisation

Erroll GarnerProducing legendary American jazz pianist and composer Erroll Garner for London Records taught me as much about creativity and defining success in life and career as it did about his musical genius.

Born in Pittsburgh on June 15, 1921,  Erroll began playing piano at the age of three. Like most kids, he didn’t write his goals down on paper or construct a rudimentary business plan; he simply played. He was self-taught and “played by ear,” never learning to read music. He appeared on KDKA radio at the age of seven and by the ripe old age of 11 was performing on Allegheny riverboats. In 1947 played with Charlie Parker on the “Cool Blues” session. Tall on talent but short in stature (5’2″), Erroll performed while sitting on a stack of phone books. An instrumentalist, his grunting and groaning vocalizations can be heard on his recordings and are his signature while his musical style is a combination of using his right hand to play behind the beat while his left strummed a steady rhythm. His musical sense of humor came from his improvised introductions to pieces that had nothing to do with the songs they set up. His composition “Misty” is a jazz standard.

Erroll Garner’s s life and legacy taught me:

  • Follow your passion without compromise.
  • Life is about improvisation.
  • Don’t wait to learn it to live it. Live your passion every moment and keep learning along the way.
  • Don’t play to convention. Do what comes naturally and feels “right” to you.
  • Don’t take yourself too seriously. Keep your sense of humor and share it with others.

2015-04-25 10.16.21Bass, Electric Bass – Bob Cranshaw
Congas – Jose Mangual
Organ – Norman Gold
Percussion – Grady Tate
Piano – Erroll Garner
Producer – Garrison Leykam, Martha Glaser
Tambourine – Jackie Williams (2)

Disrupt You! is a Must Read for Entrepreneurs

Disrupt You book coverDynamic entrepreneur and intrepreneur Jay Samit has been described by Wired magazine as “having the coolest job in the industry.” He has raised hundreds of millions of dollars for startups, sold companies to Fortune 500 firms, transforms entire industries, revamps government institutions, and for three decades continues to be at the forefront of global trends. And, in his new book, Disrupt You! Jay tells you how to master personal transformation, seize opportunity and thrive in the era of endless innovation.

Buy Disrupt You! It’s the single best investment you can make in yourself. Check out Jay’s website and follow him on Twitter and Instagram

“What makes Garrison stand out from other radio and podcast interviewers is his unique ability to draw out the best stories from his guests.  His masterful preparation melts away any distance between the guest and the audience until one feels like they are sitting in a booth at a favorite diner listening to dear friends reminisce after years apart.” Jay Samit, business icon, entrepreneur thought leader and author of Disrupt You!

Can You “Fathom” Your Company Culture as Worth Fighting For?

BrentBrent Robertson and the team at Fathom do one thing and they do it better than anyone else: they work with business leaders to design futures worth fighting for.  Period.
While business journals make the claim that culture somehow arrives at the corporate doorstep only after structures and decisions are put in place, West Hartford, CT-based Focus is re-hitching the horse to the front of the performance wagon and showing leaders how to drive powerful, culturally-driven outcomes.
Fathom logoWith Fathom’s Design Day experiential kick-starter and a menu of powerful transformational programs that can deliver quantifiable results, any manufacturing, architectural, construction or engineering firm can re-find and reshape its identity to develop strategies for transforming their business and bottom line. Fathom facilitates casting new light on any company’s core brand identity and helps leaders at all organizational levels find their way back to their own greatness; a greatness not buried under features, benefits, prices and promotions but living and breathing in their own business DNA.
Do you know what your industry and clients think of you?
Kick-Start Your Most Critical Initiative In One Day
Fathom your company’s culture as worth fighting for…and get in the ring with your gloves on!

6 hours, 42 minutes and 8 seconds

Marmon Wasp 2Given my passion for motorized two- and four-wheel nostalgia, it’s great to see a company like Marmon Holdings’ heritage of innovation and quality exemplified by Ray Harroun and his Marmon Wasp. Ray is best known for the 6 hours, 42 minutes, and 8 seconds it took him to win the first Indianapolis 500 automobile race, at an average speed of 74.6 mph.

Marmon WaspA part-time racer, Ray Harroun was foremost an engineer for the Marmon Motor Car Company, an early 20th century producer of passenger cars that are frequently cited as exemplars of the golden age of the American automobile. He designed the six-cylinder Marmon Wasp, so named for its yellow and black color scheme, from stock Marmon engine components. Unlike most racecars of the period, the Wasp was built with a smoothly-cowled cockpit and a long, pointed tail to reduce air drag. That little item in your car called the rear-view mirror? That was Ray’s idea!  

Not long after Mr. Harroun’s return to Indy, Marmon-Herrington Company, a successor to the old Marmon Motor Car Company joined a growing group of businesses that had been acquired by brothers Jay and Robert Pritzker. At the time, the group included a dozen businesses, but lacked a name. In 1964, Marmon was chosen to connote excellence in engineering and performance. 

Kudos to Marmon!

 

Long Live the No.2 Pencil…and Crayolas and Fountain Pens

No 2 pencilKudos to Sharon Fisher on her wonderful article in Laserfiche, Will Computers Make Pens and Pencils Obsolete? I readily admit to my passionate affair with my fountain pens, Crayolas and pencils to the point at which I will have a graphite duel (“choose your No.2”) with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella to defend the pencil’s existence against threats by computers, smartphones, tablets and the removal of cursive writing from “Common Core” instruction in our schools. The single reason that the printing industry was profitable in 2015 was the demand for adult coloring books. Follow-the-dots books are about to further insure print publishing’s bottom line.

Eiffel Tower pencilMy relationship with the No.2 pencil goes from loyalty to sublime aesthetic passion anytime that Russian artist Salavat Fidai’s miniature carvings into the tips of graphite pencils are on exhibit. They are unique art forms and never fail to elicit “ooh’s” and “ah’s” from observers.

So, as far as No.2 pencils becoming obsolete, it will take more than technology to move me away from my graphitic creative wanderings.

 

do one small thing TO MAKE A BIG CHANGE

bloodstone-natural-high-londonChange has a way of eluding most people because they believe that in order to change you have to eat the whole enchilada rather than have just one bite. Take dieting, for example. Some of the most grandiose plans go into the most short-lived dieting strategies which fail because the incremental steps are dismissed in favor of all or nothing goals. But, just one small change, the right one, can bring major life-changing results.

51-seconds seems like an infinitesimal bit of time. Yet, for the American R&B, soul and funk band Bloodstone, it changed their musical path and launched them into the charts. “Natural High” was the first single and title track from their London Records album of the song name released in 1972. When I edited “Natural High” from 4:53 to 4:02 in 1973 to garner airplay on time-restricted AM radio stations, the song skyrocketed to the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #10 and to #4 on the Billboard R&B singles chart. The 51-seconds change turned out to be monumental in Bloodstone’s success.

Doris Troy Just One LookThat storm-strewn endogenous maelstrom we call our emotions can be calmed with “Just One Look,” as the lyrics of Doris Clark’s 1963 hit single exclaimed: “Just one look, that’s all it took” and “I fell so hard in love with you.”

As big as the world is, tiny things have changed the course of history. The failure of the tiny O-ring on the space shuttle Challenger led to a re-examination of the country’s space program and dashed people’s hopes and dreams. The Arab discovery of the zero (“0”) made modern mathematics possible. The invention of the printing press made mass education a reality. Security officer Frank Wills’ discovery of a piece of masking tape keeping a hotel room door unlocked led to the arrest of five men inside the Democratic National Committee’s office in the Washington D.C. Watergate building leading to an FBI investigation and the resignation of a president.

A tiny change can have massive creative and life-changing implications. Identify that one, small change you can make and do it. Focus all of your effort on it. Ignore the musical score and take laser focus on the one note of your life or career that moves you in a new direction.