Category Archives: Finding Meaningful Work at 70

Respect you and your goal to find meaningful work

“To be a comedian, you have to get onstage and find out if you’re funny” – Rodney Dangerfield.

Rodney Dangerfield is the patron saint of comedians wondering when their ship will come in. Imagine having no success and after nine years of failure, giving it up in disgust, moving to New Jersey, and selling aluminum siding. “At the time I quit, I was the only one who knew I quit.” Years later he tried again, this time wrecking his marriage, and failing once more. “It was like a need. I had to work. I had to tell jokes. I had to write them and tell them.” Epiphany: Continue reading Respect you and your goal to find meaningful work

“As for me, prizes are nothing. My prize is my work.” Katharine Hepburn

Katharine Hepburn was an unlikely Hollywood star. Possessing a distinctive speech pattern and an abundance of quirky mannerisms, she earned unqualified praise from her admirers and unmerciful criticism from her detractors. Unabashedly outspoken and iconoclastic, she did as she pleased, refusing to grant interviews and wearing casual clothes at a time when actresses were expected to exude glamour 24 hours a day. Continue reading “As for me, prizes are nothing. My prize is my work.” Katharine Hepburn

George Burns’ best one-liner about meaningful work

“I’d rather be a failure at something I love than a success at something I hate.” – George Burns

At the time of his Oscar win for Best Supporting Actor in The Sunshine Boys at 80 years old, Burns was the oldest recipient of an Academy Award. Continue reading George Burns’ best one-liner about meaningful work

Brewing the perfect cup of career reinvention

When Bradley Gold got laid off at 53 from a senior management position, he knew it was going to be a challenge to find another job in the corporate world. He also knew it was now or never to pursue his lifelong dream of owning his own restaurant. Continue reading Brewing the perfect cup of career reinvention

What would the painting of your career reinvention look like?

Georgia O’Keeffe is recognized as the “Mother of American modernism.” By age 10 she had decided to become an artist but her traditional art education discouraged her and at 21 she abandoned the idea entirely, assuming she would never distinguish herself in the strict realist tradition of her teachers. Continue reading What would the painting of your career reinvention look like?

Don’t be in the dark about your career reinvention

After returning to Liberia in 2009 where he had been a Peace Corps volunteer decades before, Richard Fahey was struck that nothing had changed. Even after the country had been immersed in civil war, it was as if time had stopped. Electricity was undependable. At sunset, entire towns would go dark. Continue reading Don’t be in the dark about your career reinvention