Category Archives: Resumes

SUMMER: TIS AN IDEAL RÉSUMÉ UPDATE SEASON

Summer is synonymous with vacations, road trips, and getting away with the family. But, guess what: jobs take vacations, too, which means that June, July and August are ideal months to update your résumé and make your LinkedIn profile more searchable and compelling.

Most companies have already committed their recruiting budget well before Memorial Day arrives and hiring managers have put their candidate searches on hold, except for temporary, entry-level, and minimum wage positions. Company executives have shifted their attention to analyzing business trends and preparing early drafts of 4th Quarter strategies to meet the annual plan. So, use this seasonal recruiting downtrend to solidify your candidate marketing by making your résumé more achievement-driven and Applicant Tracking Software-friendly. Add new skills you’ve acquired, include new professional development you’ve experienced, and insert those certifications you’ve earned. Challenge yourself to extend every single job function you have listed into an impact it had on your company, clients, or industry. Replace your laundry list of “things you do” with achievements you’ve made.

Shift your LinkedIn profile into high gear by creating a headline that tells readers WHAT role you’re in, WHO you help, HOW you make organizations better, and give PROOF that you are credible IN ONE LINE! Does your profile photo need updating? Does your Summary tell your personal brand story? Is your Experience in synch with what’s on your résumé? How about getting some more Recommendations and looking for new Groups to join and, most importantly, participating in? Are your Skills up-to-date to make you a player in the hidden job market? How about setting-up some Google Alerts to email yourself daily articles in your niche so you can post them with your comments, opinions, and insight?

Schedule a FREE 15-minute career consultation with Certified Professional Career Coach Garrison Leykam

RÉSUMÉ CRINGE FACTORS

Nothing tests a hiring manager’s patience more than those often seen résumé mistakes which, for just a little bit of time and attention on the writer’s part, could lower the reader’s stress level and further the candidate’s cause. Here are some of the most annoying résumé cringe factors that don’t seem to go away:

Always tell the truth. Even if you make it through the Applicant Tracking Software, aka ATS, there are other credibility check-points for dates of employment, job titles, and gaps, to name just a few. Use a cover letter, not a cover-up, to address in a positive way any job candidacy issues.

Buzzwords are business lingo with a short shelf-life. Knowing when they’re overused and outdated is key to crafting a compelling résumé. Be wary of terms like synergy, outside the box, game changer, guru, coopetition, wheelhouse, organic growth, leverage, visionary, growth hack, viral, blogosphere, paradigm shift, disruptive, heavy lifting, hit the ground running, and other outdated terms. Ordering an Adam and Eve on a raft in today’s modern diner will not get you two poached eggs on toast.

If you want to bypass the ATS altogether and go direct to the circular file then spell the hiring manager or recruiter’s name wrong. Nothing is more insulting to personal pride than having one’s name misspelled. Long before the modern trend of deliberately altering the conventional spelling of traditional names became popular in naming babies and recording artists, careless people misspelled ordinary names like Michael and Margaret, reversing letters (Micheal) or leaving them out (Margret). And, misspelling your own name is even worse, but I’ve seen it happen. Don’t rely on spellcheck. “There,” “they’re,” and “their” all sound alike but have different meanings. Double-check how the company name is written, too.

“References available upon request” at the bottom of a resume is outdated. If it’s in your résumé, take it out.

For industrial designers, graphic artists, and anyone whose candidacy is portfolio-driven, include the links, just like you would for your email address and LinkedIn profile. I never cease to be amazed at how many talented and creative people refer to their work without providing the hiring manager with a direct connection URL. If a recruiter on the average spends a mere 6 to 11 seconds perusing your resume, do you think they’re going to take the time to find examples of your work? You must be your your PR person and talent agent and make your creativity easy to click to.

Saying that you are skilled at Microsoft Office Suite, in particular, Word and Excel or Outlook email dates you for most office and managerial positions. These are take-it-for-granted-you-know-them-skills. Even social media, the prevalent communication currency today, is outdated resume content unless you’re applying for a social media job and need to describe things like campaigns you’ve created. It’s better to use your résumé real estate to list those in-demand skills that make you the exceptional candidate.

Schedule a FREE 15-minute career consultation with Certified Professional Career Coach Garrison Leykam at https://calendly.com/garrison-1

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is AUDACIOUS-book-cover-as-jpeg-642x1024.jpg

RÉSUMÉ DON’TS

DON’T use subjective keywords like “reliable” and “hardworking.”

DON’T use creative wording and long phrases.

DON’T take a one-résumé-does-all approach.

DON’T say, “References Upon Request.”

DON’T include languages you learned in high school.

DON’T focus on “duties” instead of “achievements.”

DON’T include “email,” “Word” or “Excel.”

DON’T list “social media” unless it’s a requirement of the job you’re applying to.

DON’T list outdated technology.

DON’T include irrelevant skills.

DON’T forget to proofread more than once.

Schedule a FREE 15-minute career consultation with Certified Professional Career Coach Garrison Leykam at https://calendly.com/garrison-1

RÉSUMÉ “DO’S”

Use both spelled-out words as well as their acronyms: Bachelor of Science (BS) and Electronic Medical Records (EMR).

Include keywords from the job description.

Use bullets, not paragraphs, for your achievements.

Use a font size between 10.5 and 12.

Margins 1″ all-around.

Single spacing with a blank line between sections.

Include all titles you held at a company and the dates.

Schedule a FREE 15-minute career consultation with Certified Professional Career Coach Garrison Leykam at https://calendly.com/garrison-1

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is logos-collage.png
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is AUDACIOUS-book-cover-as-jpeg-188x300.jpg

RÉSUMÉ GROUND RULES

The Number 5 is commonly referred to as the number of humanity. Human beings have five fingers, five toes, five appendages (if the head is included), five senses, and five major systems of the body. It should therefore be of no surprise that there are 5 résumé ground rules that you need to pay attention to:

1-The goal of every résumé is singular: TO GET THE INTERVIEW

2-The focus should be on ACHIEVEMENTS

3-You need to adapt your resume to every opportunity you apply for

4-Specific formatting and styles need to be used to get through the Applicant Tracking Software (ATS)

5-Keywords should be optimized

Schedule a FREE 15-minute career consultation with Certified Professional Career Coach Garrison Leykam at https://calendly.com/garrison-1

Be FONTastic with your resume

Be selective in choosing what font to use in your resume.

Choosing a Serif font like Cambria, Garamond, or Georgia convey reliability and authority and are particularly useful in fields that are highly compliant and regulated like Finance, Law, and Science.

If you’re applying for positions with cutting-edge, disruptive companies use Arial, Calibri, or Tahoma that convey innovation and simplicity.

Schedule a FREE 15-minute career consultation with Certified Professional Career Coach Garrison Leykam at https://calendly.com/garrison-1