Category Archives: Resumes

11 Resume Tips for 2021

To get the interview for your next career move, your résumé has to communicate that you are the ideal candidate. Here are 11 résumé tips for selling yourself in 2021:

  1. Prerequisite: format the entire résumé to make it ATS-friendly and focus on keyword matching to the specific job posting. ATS “reads” resumes like human beings (right to left/top to bottom) so make sure your work history starts with your most recent or current position. Although there are three common resume formats (chronological, combination, and functional), ATS prefers the first two, as do recruiters. Telling your career story and progression lends itself to a chronological résumé and a non-chronological functional résumé  wreaks havoc with ATS which doesn’t know how to sort experience without a clear work history to draw from. The main job of ATS is to scan your résumé for relevant keywords by converting it to a text-only file. So, get rid of fancy formatting like tables, graphs, charts, photos, logos, headers, footers, images, full page columns and uncommon section headings.  Stick to a universal font like Arial, Tahoma, Helvetica, Times New Roman, Garamond, Georgia, or Cambria and avoid fonts you need to download which the ATS may have trouble parsing. On the other hand, feel free to bold and underline your headers with a font size of 11 with the rest of the text at 10. Italics are also ATS-friendly as is underlining. I would avoid putting any text in colors; not that ATS can’t read it but it’s going to reduce everything to black anyway. Bullets are preferred over long-winded narrative so stick to the standard circle- or square-shaped ones. One-inch all-around on your margins is the best way to go and I like to set my line spacing options at 12 exactly.
  2. “Above the fold” refers to the upper half of the front page of a newspaper or tabloid where an important news story or photograph is located. Use this approach for your résumé because recruiters average only 6-11 seconds visually glancing to see if they want to read  on. When they do, don’t fall into the deadfall trap that your résumé has to be on one page. Your résumé needs to market you effectively and include enough about you to prove you’re qualified for the job without overwhelming the reader. Résumé length can vary based on factors like experience, field, and the job you’re applying for. Two to three pages is the standard length for résumés in 2021 to fit all keywords, experience, and skills. If you’re concerned that a longer résumé will slow down a hiring manager during their six-second résumé test, the “six-second” figure comes from a review after an ATS scan has determined your fit for the position. Recent studies suggest that recruiters are 2.3x more likely to prefer a résumé that’s more than one page and includes all of your relevant experience, achievements, education, certifications and professional development.
  3. Your headline should match the title of the position you’re applying to. Position titles are among the most commonly searched ATS keywords.
  4. Use the summary to succinctly highlight your professional skills and experience. Laser focus on the unique, transferable value you can bring to the specific role you’re applying for.
  5. Follow your summary with a core skills section so that readers can easily scan your relevant competencies. This is a key section of your résumé because SKILLS = KEYWORDS and enhance how you match with a job description.
  6. If you’re applying online, avoid graphic elements like charts, graphs, tables and shaded areas. It confuses ATS which “sees” them as photos and can’t “read” them. It’s best to send a résumé as a Word doc if you are applying through a public job board or company career page. If you’re sending it to someone you know via email, PDF is fine. Otherwise, use Word.
  7. Generally, it is reasonable to go back 10 – 15 years in your work history unless you’ve been with a company longer than that and you can demonstrate a progressive ladder of success.
  8. Avoid run-on paragraphs when describing your professional experience. Instead, use bullet points to tailor your transferable achievements to what the prospective employer is looking for. Avoid the “everything but the kitchen sink” approach. Stick to those achievements and competencies that are most relevant. Demonstrate the impact you’ve made and quantify (objectify) it wherever possible.
  9. Avoid outdated résumé information like your street address and References Upon Request.
  10. Spell check until it hurts and then spell check again.
  11. Include a cover letter with your résumé and send it to a specific person in your target company (eg, Vice President of Human Resources or Director of Talent Acquisition) to expand your candidate visibility.

About Garrison Leykam, PhD:

Certified Business Coach (Expert Level)
Certified Remote Work Professional
Certified Professional Career Coach (CPCC)
Certified Professional, Résumé Writer (CPRW)
Certified Employment Interview Professional (CEIP)
Certified Life Coach (Expert Level)
PhD Marketing, MA Psychology
LinkedIn profile in Top 25 MA, PhD profiles in U.S.
Top 1% LinkedIn Industry Social Selling Index
Author, Audacious at Any Age and Design You

ARE YOU A T-SHAPE OR I-SHAPE JOB CANDIDATE?

T-shaped skills are referred to in job recruitment to describe the abilities of candidates. The vertical bar of the T refers to expert knowledge and experience in one particular area. The horizontal top of the T refers to an ability to collaborate with experts in other disciplines. Immensely empathetic T-shaped individuals can see through others’ eyes, walk in their shoes, listen actively, and create solutions that build on their ideas. They shine in diverse, collaborative teams and standout among recruiters and hiring managers compared to I-shaped job applicants. Continue reading ARE YOU A T-SHAPE OR I-SHAPE JOB CANDIDATE?

Heads Up on Resume Headers

You may not be familiar with names like iCIMS, Bullhorn and Ascendify, but these software gatekeepers  decide whether your resume or online application is passed through to a hiring manager or discarded. Commonly referred to by their acronym, ATS, Applicant Tracking Software (ATS) compares submitted resumes and online applications to job postings to determine whether there is a strong candidate match to what the employer is looking for.  Resumes and online applications are stored in a database and recruiters can search submissions using keywords and phrases to identify who to advance through the hiring process based upon applicant rankings. Avoid this one critical mistake so many job seekers make on their resume! Continue reading Heads Up on Resume Headers

Don’t leave diversity off your resume

Don’t leave off diversity in your resume. Diversity encompasses race, gender, ethnicity, generations, religion, sexual orientation, life and work experiences, language, and anything else that gives you an expanded perspective. Employers look for key abilities and attributes that demonstrate a candidate’s diversity experience. Continue reading Don’t leave diversity off your resume

Where’s the résumé beef?

Back in 1984, 81-year old retired Chicago manicurist-turned-disgruntled old lady Clara Peller asserted that a Wendy’s Hamburger served up a comparatively bigger value by asking the fast food competition, “Where’s the beef?” Today, Clara’s iconic words could become the voice of Applicant Tracking Software which, when it rejects an estimated 70 percent of the resumes submitted because of low keyword matches against the desired qualifications or it can’t figure out the formatting, analyzes a spectrogram to generate a voice that asks itself, “Where’s the résumé beef?”

Read the full article on LinkedIn

FUEL YOUR RÉSUMÉ WITH ACTION KEYWORDS

Think of a job posting as a gift. The prospective employer has literally shared with you the experience, skills, and education being sought in qualified candidates. The greater the match between your résumé and the job description, the higher the probability of being selected for an interview. And, keywords narrow the qualifying gap.

The one-résumé-does-all with the generic cover letter, like Elvis, have left the building. You have to:

Continue reading FUEL YOUR RÉSUMÉ WITH ACTION KEYWORDS